A couple who sued for nervous shock after their twin daughter died five days after her delivery at Waterford University Hospital has settled an action against the HSE at the High Court.

Baby Alex Widger died just five days after she and her twin sister Robyn were delivered by caesarean section in 2014.

Monica and Brian Widger, Bramble way, Foxwood, six Cross Roads, Waterford city had sued the HSE for nervous shock over the death of Baby Alex.

It was claimed in May 2014, during Mrs Widger’s pregnancy with her twins, it was ascertained that she was carrying identical twins who shared the same placenta but individual fetal sacs.

Her pregnancy was recognised as one of high-risk character requiring special care and attention up to and including the birth of the twins.

A growth discrepancy was noted between the twins and AIex was underdeveloped. Repeated monitoring was undertaken by hospital staff, it was claimed.

On June 13,2014, Mrs Widger underwent ultrasound scanning at the hospital and it was noted Baby Alex was suffering from a low fetal heartbeat and CTG monitoring took plâce over that weekend.

On June 14, it was claimed a decision was made not to effect delivery and to continue to observe the progress of the pregnancy. On June 15, the CTG trace remained unsatisfactory and deteriorated, showing significant decelerations, and by late afternoon there was an acute failure of Alex’s fetal heart.

A caesarean section was carried out, and the twins were delivered that evening.

It was claimed on June 17, 20 14, Alex’s condition deteriorated and the parents were advised the baby’s condition was terminal. Alex died on June 20, 20t4.

The HSE admitted there was a delay in the delivery of the twins on June 15, 2014, and that such a delay was in breach of duty of care. It was not admitted that the delay in delivery caused the death of baby Alex and causation was at issue in the case.

Approving the settlement, the terms of which are confidential, Mr Justice Kevin Cross sympathised with the Widgers on their loss.